Thursday, May 21, 2020

The Presidential Election For The Presidency Of The United...

Watching the 2016 Republican candidates battle for the presidency of the United States, one might reach the conclusion that Ronald Reagan never left the campaign trail. In the second GOP debate alone, the â€Å"Great Communicator’s† name was brought up a total of 23 times, which even exceeds the number of times Donald Trump mentioned China. One of the comments coming from Jeb Bush was â€Å"I’m on the Reagan side of this.† Additionally, Senator Marco Rubio stated that â€Å"Reagan and his approach worked (CITE).† The candidates worked hard to evoke memories of and make comparisons to the beloved former president. The debate even took place in the Ronald Reagan Library in Simi Valley, California. Reagan has been constantly praised by those on the†¦show more content†¦For more than 30 years before Reagan took office, the United States and its allies had tried unsuccessfully to rein in communism. Reagan believed that communism in the So viet Union was eroding and ready to crumble, expecting its collapse if competitively challenged by America. An arms race had been ongoing between the U.S. and Russia for some time. Reagan, however, was determined to put an end to it. Reagan began the competition with a very costly project known as the Strategic Defense Initiative, aimed at neutralizing incoming Soviet missiles. This shocked the Soviet Union, which was economically unable to match this rapid escalation of the arms race (CITE). After winning his second term as president, Ronald Reagan established what is now known as â€Å"The Reagan Doctrine,† which provided support, both financially and militarily, for anti-communist fighters throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America (CITE). The policy’s goal was to eliminate tyrannical governments and promote individual liberties, freedom, and democracy. The Reagan doctrine became the centerpiece of the Reagan administration by successfully stopping the Soviet Union from spreading its communist control over specific regions of the world. In 1985, a new leader by the name of Mikhail Gorbachev came to the political forefront of the Soviet Union. Reagan saw this as his final opportunity to completely destroy the threat of communism once and for all. Reagan and Gorbachev metShow MoreRelatedThe Race Of Presidency : 2016 United States Presidential Election1116 Words   |  5 Pages2016 The Race to Presidency The 2016 United States presidential election is coming to a close with five candidates left running for the seat. But only three of them gets the most attention of the mass media. One Donald J Trump who is a multi-Billionaire, TV personality, and a businessman. The other former first lady who is running for a second consecutive time since her lost to president Obama back in 2008. And then there is Bernie Sanders a state senator from the great state of Vermont. These areRead MoreWomen And The Presidency : Ending The Misogyny1730 Words   |  7 Pages2017 Women The Presidency: Ending the Misogyny Looking back to high school American history class, one can open the textbook to the reference section and gaze at the page listing all the previous presidents that served: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, Barack Obama, etc. The one thing that all the former presidents have in common is that they are all men. Never in the 200-plus years of American history has a woman served as President of the United States. However, accordingRead MoreThe Electoral College Is A System886 Words   |  4 Pages the majority winner wins the presidency. Each state gets a certain number of electoral votes, there is a total of 538 electoral votes, and a majority of 270 votes is required to elect the president. The number of votes each state receives are based on the sum of Representatives in the House of Representatives and the Senate, the District of Columbia also receives 3 electoral votes. The majority winner of the Electoral College votes wins the candidacy. Some states have a system in place calledRead MoreReligion : The United States And The European Union1648 Words   |  7 Pagesboth our individual and collective life (Hajizadeh, 2013). Religion plays an integral role in every country whether it is a third-world country, such as some African or Middle Eastern countries, or industrialized capitalist countries like the United States and the European Union. Over the past few decades many global events have brought religion’s growing influence over society, especially its role in affecting politics (Hajizadeh, 2013). The biggest religious event/influence in recent years wouldRead MorePresidential Elections As Part Of A Democratic Process928 Words   |  4 PagesPresidential Election Scholars define democracy in various ways. However, they all agree that democracy is the participation of citizens in a political process without limitations. A democratic political process primarily includes free and fair elections. The essay will examine presidential elections as part of a democratic process. Britain colonized the US, but later they gained their independence, the founders of the democratic United States came up with a system where citizens had power and obligationRead MorePresidential Election Of United States1497 Words   |  6 Pages1596 Presidential Elections Introduction The presidential elections of United States of America take an indirect form where citizens of the U.S who are registered as voters in one of the states in U.S which are usually 50 states, or the District of Columbia, cast ballots for Electoral College members, referred to as electors. These electors then in turn cast direct votes known as electoral votes in their respective state capitals for president and vice president positions of the United States. EachRead MoreMy Presidential Election For President Of The United States926 Words   |  4 Pagesnext presidential election for the United States I see names such as Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders running to lead our country. With the amount of candidates running for the next presidential term, I often wonder what it takes to throw one’s hat in the ring, and the steps they have to take to get into office. Are there any restrictions, age limits, financial obligations one must meet before going through the long road to presid ency? Before announcing to run for President of the United StatesRead MoreElection Day Millions Of Americans1317 Words   |  6 PagesDuring election day millions of Americans are going to cast their vote for who they want to be the next president of the United States. Except is a lot more complicated than it seems. The electoral college is the collection of 538 delegates that have the power to determine who the next president will be; the number of total representatives in the House and Senate. These 538 votes aren’t given to the citizen directly, but they are instead divided among the 50 states in America. Currently, people areRead MoreElection Day, President Of The United States1318 Words   |  6 PagesDuring election day, millions of Americans are going to cast their vote for who they want to be the next president of the United States. Except is a lot more complicated than it seems. The electoral college is the collection of 538 delegates that have the power to determine who the next president will be; the number of total representatives in the House and Senate. These 538 votes aren’t given to the citizen directly, but they are instead divided among the 50 states in America. Currently, peopleRead MoreIs The Electoral College Obsolete?1158 Words   |  5 PagesGeorge Bush election of 2000, Albert Gorse won the popular vote by 547,398 votes. However, George Bush won the election because of the Electoral College process. Normally, the winner of the popular vote wins the office or election. However, during this election it was not the case. Albert Gore did not win by a landslide; nevertheless, he still won the popular vote (Deatrick, 2012). While the typical American citizen may say that this one case is insignificant compared to the other elections, the significance

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Mass Media Is An Integral Part Of Everyday Life - 989 Words

Mass media is an integral part of everyday life. Society depends on the various forms of media for information, education, and personal entertainment. Mass media positively and negatively influences beliefs, values, and expands knowledge to bring awareness to various social events. Media also impacts the way children and adolescences understanding of violence, racism, suicide, aggression, and sexual stereotyping. If viewing these portrayals is accepted, then mass media does in fact negatively impact child and adolescent development because of the content displayed on movies, television, and music. Children and adolescents learn to accept and have distorted views of violence, racism, sexual stereotyping, sexual behavior and suicide represented on TV. According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (2015), children ages 8-18 spend an average of 7.5 hours a day with media and technology screens. Today, television shows and movies can be viewed on numerous devi ces. Children today will spend 27,375 hours viewing media which is more time than they will spend in a classroom setting in high school. Media entertainment is persuasive and has a strong influence on today’s children. The American Academy of Pediatrics has a policy statement that concludes, â€Å"Exposure to violence in media, including TV, movies, music and video games, represents a significant risk to the health of children and adolescents† (American Academy of Psychiatry, 2012). Today, theShow MoreRelatedThe Impact Of Mass Media On Youth And Society1378 Words   |  6 PagesThe Impact of Mass Media on the Youth and Society Nowadays, the issue of mass media has caused much debate in the modern society, as well as mass media is becoming more important as a component that negatively affects the behavior of young people. There are many other factors, such as micro-environment, economic instability, the decline of moral values affecting children and young people and encourage them to commit unlawful acts. However, unlimited access to the Internet, mobile phone use in theRead MoreEssay on Mass Media Society1080 Words   |  5 PagesImpact of Mass Media on Individuals, Society, and Culture Mass media, over the years, has had a profound effect on American society, on its culture, and on the individuals exposed to the media. Mass media is a form of socialization, having a long-term effect on each member of American society. While mass media targets the individual in short-term intervals, the overall influence on them has been established as the consumer moves from one impressionable age category to another. The long or short-Read MoreEssay about Impact of Mass Media on Individuals, Society, and Culture1178 Words   |  5 PagesImpact of Mass Media on Individuals, Society, and Culture Mass media, over the years, has had a profound effect on American society, on its culture, and on the individuals exposed to the media. Mass media is a form of socialization, having a long-term effect on each member of American society. While mass media targets the individual in short-term intervals, the overall influence on them has been established as the consumer moves from one impressionable age category to another. The long or short-Read MoreNeed N Importance of Mass Media in Our Daily Life1377 Words   |  6 PagesMass media has become an integral part of our lives and can not be separated from our life. Particularly for the urban people, the need for information is more important than ever. Our values and way of life in the society in this information era are strongly influenced by the mass media like newspapers, TV, radio, video, and the internet. Mass media’s influence on people’s lives is even greater and deeper than many kinds of state indoctrination or priest’s sermons from the pulpit in the church Read MoreNeed N Importance of Ma ss Media in Our Daily Life1386 Words   |  6 PagesMass media has become an integral part of our lives and can not be separated from our life. Particularly for the urban people, the need for information is more important than ever. Our values and way of life in the society in this information era are strongly influenced by the mass media like newspapers, TV, radio, video, and the internet. Mass media’s influence on people’s lives is even greater and deeper than many kinds of state indoctrination or priest’s sermons from the pulpit in the church Read MoreEssay On Mass Media777 Words   |  4 PagesAhsha Rolle 8/28/2017 HUM/186 Allyson Wells Mass Media: Development and Literacy Assignment What were the major developments in the evolution of mass media during the last century? In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Americans received their news through newspapers and magazines. Television journalism has just taken over in the last 50 years. Today, the internet makes information and news available at the click of a button. 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In the present era, social media has become an integral part of our lives. All aspects of our lives have changed from politics to society, culture, and economics via social media and new technologies. Social media has caused revolutionary changesRead MoreThe Media and Its Responsibilities Essays1688 Words   |  7 Pagesincludes duties and responsibilities. The media is an integral part of everyday life and has become a leading player and influence of our society and it have an outcome on our nations’ future, viewpoint, and the globe’s view of us. The media are responsible for mainstream America ideals and the familiarity of the image based on the impact from the media. The media are fundamental of social influence and political decisions. The media have turned the average person on realityRead MoreThe Globalization of Culture1139 Words   |  5 Pagesthe late 20th century, and along with it is the ongoing development of trade, urbanization and the sharing of knowledge (Wikipedia). The constant rotation of the source of goods, knowledge, new ideas and the explosion of information technology and mass media has brought cultures into contact with each other. As an inevitable consequence, globalization has created an impact on culture, causing changes in three main aspects which are traditional values, human behavior and other forms of art and entertainment

Am I Eligible for Student Finance Free Essays

International Student Guide One of the major things student should ask, am I eligible for student finance. Student worry if they are able to afford their living expenses as they are moving away from home. This includes educational materials and books, students have to consider rent, food, travel, and other household costs on top of their tuition fees. We will write a custom essay sample on Am I Eligible for Student Finance? or any similar topic only for you Order Now Student loans can help with these necessary expenses, but how do you know if you are eligible for student finance. How do beat the shortage of financial aid and funding Qualifying for a student loan depends on many factors including where you live, which university or college you have chosen to attend, which course you are studying, if you have studied before, and your age. Generally speaking, you will need to be a UK resident or have ‘settled’ status to qualify for a student loan. The university or college you are planning to attend must be a UK degree-awarding institution, a college which receives government funding, a private institution which offers specifically designated higher education courses, or one of the schools which take part in the SCITT (School-Centred Initial Teacher Training) Scheme. Your course must lead to a first degree (such as a Bachelor of Arts, Education or Science), a Foundation Degree, a Diploma of Higher Education, a Certificate of Higher Education, a Higher National Diploma, or a Higher National Certificate. You are also likely to qualify if you are studying an Initial Teacher Training course. Information regarding your eligibility can be found on government websites, and your college or university will also be able to help you determine if you are eligible, as well as guide you through the application process and help you avoid any unnecessary delays or mistakes with the paperwork. There is plenty of help out there for students. In many cases, it is just a matter of asking for it! Also review top 15 scholarships for International Students. If you are looking for help with your Essay Writing, please get in touch with us today. How to cite Am I Eligible for Student Finance?, Essay examples

Saturday, April 25, 2020

To what extent do market failures result in a similar optimal allocation of resources to the innovation process Essay Example

To what extent do market failures result in a similar optimal allocation of resources to the innovation process Essay Innovation has a crucial impact on the standards of living in particular economy. It is generally agreed that research and innovation are the main sources of growth and job creation in market economies. i. e. output is increased through greater acquisition of knowledge. Subsequently, 2 things matter for economic growth: savings and the state of the productive knowledge (i. e. shows how productivity the extra capital will be used). The production function diagram below can illustrate this Where labour productivity per worker experiences diminishing marginal returns This diagram shows how economic growth can be realised by accumulation of capital and/or higher levels of knowledge. It should be noted that productivity growth is the difference between the growth of inputs and the growth of outputs and that technological progress is measured as residual-so that any problems with measuring inputs or outputs, will be transferred onto measuring technological progress. There are 2 movements on the diagram: a to b due to the accumulation of capital and b to c due to the growth of productivity or technical progress. The difficulty with this is that if knowledge had not changed, the movement from a to b will not have been experienced. The only reason capital has been accumulated is due to the increase in technical progress. Generally speaking technological progress generates new wealth in two ways: either through innovative process which help to increase the productivity of labour and capital and thus enable production levels to increase and/or to save available resources, or through innovative products which lead to the creation of new markets and industries and give a boost to investment and create jobs, Hence the principal source of growth is innovation. A general consensus states a positive incidence of technological progress on growth, competitiveness and employment. We will write a custom essay sample on To what extent do market failures result in a similar optimal allocation of resources to the innovation process specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on To what extent do market failures result in a similar optimal allocation of resources to the innovation process specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on To what extent do market failures result in a similar optimal allocation of resources to the innovation process specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Enormous amounts of money are spent on innovation and studies reveal that the economic return on innovation is very high in relative terms. Reviewing the diagram on returns to innovation below can see this. Graph2 The demand curve indicates the marginal valuations of this particular product and it is assumed that a single monopoly supplier produces the goods with constant marginal costs c and sets prices above marginal costs at P. The private rate of return is B as the firm exploits its product and receives a private rate of return extended over time against the cost of innovation. The social rate of return is larger as it is the sum of the private return and consumer surplus i. e. (A+D). Better measures can be seen empirically as Nadiri (1993) concluded that the private return on innovation was usually around 20 to 30% and the average social return close to 50%. This begs the question, why are such less resources devoted to innovation even though the rate of returns to society is so high? There are many reasons to this, which I shall discuss later, but crucially it depends on the view of markets and competition. There are 3 types of views: classical (emphasis on the rate of return equalises at the competition level), the dominant view of neoclassical state of equilibrium underpinning welfare economics and economic allocation) and the dynamic view of Austrians (looks at markets as creative and focuses on innovation as an economic process and entrepreneurs as key agents). In the early 1960s various specialist agreed perfect competition was incompatible with innovation as it required huge resources and exploitation of innovation suspected increasing returns. It was typically found that industries that regarded innovation as important were concentrated industries not perfectly competitive which were consistent with Pareto optimality, Hence the reason why neoclassical firms did not optimally allocate resources to organise and fund innovation. Numerous authors like Arrow (1960), Mansfield (1968) and Nordhaus (1969) pointed to market failure- that prevent the attainment of pareto equilibria by violating one or other of the conditions for perfect competition and explained that absence of the government in the free operation of the market would lead companies to under invest in basic innovation. Market failure may be explained in terms of four aspects: uncertainties (missing markets), appropriability, indivisibility and public goods. The innovation process both generates and is influenced by uncertainty and this aspect of market failure is particularly damaging to the possibility of a Pareto-efficient allocation of resources to invention and innovation. It is the inherent level of uncertainty, which most distinguishes an R+D project from a traditional industrial investment project. Innovation entails numerous scientific, technological and commercial uncertainties, which make it difficult for financial bankers to forecast results and monitor their investment project. Put briefly, missing or future markets for contingent claims in an uncertain world do not exist in any sense sufficiently for individuals to take risks in an optimal fashion. In addition to the uncertainties, providers of capital face another major difficulty: this derives from the intangible nature of innovation and the fact that investment cost is not recoverable. Consequently, the percentage of innovation projects, which are successful and generate a return on a large investment, is usually low. Thus financial backers insist on real guarantees to cover themselves if the investment fails. It is difficult to ascertain optimal levels of innovation in an uncertain world due to the existence of information asymmetries; Stiglitz (1991) makes it clear, that the resulting unequal distribution of knowledge creates problems of adverse selection and moral hazard, which deny the possibility of Pareto-optimality. Fundamentally, innovation and information asymmetries can be regarded as one, stating not only a trade-off between static and dynamic efficiency but also that innovation and pareto-optimality are incompatible. Another market failure is appropriation externalities. They have always been recognised as a major constraint on the incentives to innovate, as investors cannot appropriate to themselves the full amount of profits, which result from their funding of research and innovative activity. Furthermore, applied and/or industrial R+D is not altogether free of this imperfect appropriablilty of profits, which investors have. Despite advances in intellectual property rights in recent years, innovative processes and products developed by companies can easily be imitated by others and in some cases with relatively little effort and capital cost. For instance, studies in Europe put the total losses as a result of imitations alone of EU companies at nearly 50billion ECU in 1994. This led to lost earnings and huge numbers of job losses. However efficient the level of protection afforded by international law, there is no question of investors being able to appropriate the entire profits from their investment in innovation; not only for the reasons stated already but also because of the powerful external factors affecting innovation activities and the indirect spin-offs from them. As, had been stated earlier, the social rate of return may exceed private rates of return, private investors only receive a small return on their investment, and therefore it is necessary for governments to act to close the gap between private and social yields on technology investment. Next, the indivisible nature of the innovation process constitutes another major obstacle to optimum allocation of private capital. If R+D activity were perfectly divisible and it were possible to predict the social and private impact of each project, it would no doubt have been easier to separate funds required between public and private capital. However, phases of the innovation process are independent and the results are often unpredictable. Also indivisibilities inherent to the innovation process imply that there are increasing returns to the exploitation of technology and that it will be necessary for firms to retain some market power if they are to recover the costs to innovation. At best, an innovating industry can be monopolistically competitive, and from this different angle, Pareto efficiency and innovation are seen to be incompatible. The, last case regards science and technology as public goods i. e. non-rival, in the sense that the marginal cost of reproducing these is negligible and their owners exercise little control over the way in which they are used. In the free market economy it makes sense for the government to find the production and/ or dissemination of scientific knowledge. But this justification of the government role in funding basic research has been challenged by recent innovative approaches because the public good attributes of scientific and technological knowledge implies that market solution to the allocation of resources to innovation will not be efficient. Economists have identified other sources of market failure such as transaction costs, the national features of some corporate governance models, the reluctance of monopolies to fund innovative work, etc. The EU introduced a science and technology policy as to corrective for pervasive market failures and also due to the emergence of the single European market. The policy emphasised obvious areas of collaboration for R+D and innovation in order to be more competitive with USA and Japan and to compete with the low wages in South America. Currently, member states are spending 1. 9% of their resources on innovation compared with 2. 5% in Japan and 2. 7% in USA. Recently, the EU set the target at an overenthusiastic 3% The policy corrects market failures in uncertainties by appropriating price structures in the missing markets and thereby reducing distortions. Moreover, missing markets imply the need for agents to form expectations on the likely private values of their questions, expectations which policy can certainly influence. Given all these difficulties, which arise from the innovation process, it would seem to be wishful thinking to imagine that scientific and technological progress could be adequately funded in all the market economies without some form of government assistance. However one needs to recognise that government intervention can fail as well. Such examples are, imperfect information, the benefit between those who pay and those who benefit, bureaucratic capture and pressure group activity. It does not automatically follow that government policy will be welfare-improving. This is particularly so with respect to innovative activates, the formulation of which entails access to detailed microeconomic and social information

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Knightia - Facts and Figures

Knightia - Facts and Figures Name: Knightia; pronounced NYE-tee-ah Habitat: Rivers and lakes of North America Historical Epoch: Eocene (55-35 million years ago) Size and Weight: About six inches long and a few ounces Diet: Small marine organisms Distinguishing Characteristics: Small size; herring-like appearance    About Knightia Most fossils from the Eocene epoch are well out of the reach of ordinary consumers, but not so the small prehistoric fish Knightia, thousands of specimens of which have been discovered in Wyomings Green River formation (in fact, Knightia is Wyomings official state fossil). Thanks to their abundance, its possible to buy a well-preserved Knightia fossil for under $100, a bargain compared to the average dinosaur! (Buyer beware, though: whenever you purchase a fossil, especially online, its essential to check its provenancethat is, whether it really is a genuine specimen of Knightia or simply a baby salmon that has been crushed between two bricks.) Part of the reason there are so many Knightia fossils is that there were so many Knightiathis six-inch-long fish assembled in vast schools throughout the lakes and rivers of Eocene North America, and lay near the bottom of the aquatic food chain (meaning that these huge populations of Knightia sustained larger, scarcer predators, including the prehistoric fish Diplomystus and Mioplosus). Befitting its small size, Knightia itself fed not on fish, but on tiny marine organisms like plankton and diatoms, and it was very herring-like in its appearance and behaviorso much so that it was originally classified as a species of the herring genus Clupea.

Sunday, March 1, 2020

Bits and Bytes

Bits and Bytes Bits and Bytes Bits and Bytes By Simon Kewin In its election manifesto, one of the major political parties in the UK recently promised to provide virtually every household in the country a broadband service of at least 2 megabytes per second by 2012. The â€Å"2 megabytes per second† was actually a mistake. A speed of two megabytes per second is the same way as saying 16 megabits per second, a speed which is technically feasible, but unlikely to be universally available in the UK any time soon. The sentence was altered in later versions of the manifesto to the much more realistic â€Å"2 megabits per second†. The typo, however, highlights how easy it is to make mistakes using technical language where words often have very specific meanings. If you’re using terminology from medicine, computers, statistics etc., it pays to check that you have each term correct. In this case, the original authors confused the words bit and byte. Both are units of computer memory/storage. A bit is the smallest amount of storage, a 0 or a 1, the word formed from a blend of â€Å"binary† and â€Å"digit†. A byte, on the other hand, is a collection of bits – almost always eight of them. So, a kilobyte is eight times larger than a kilobit. While computer memory is generally expressed as a number of bytes (kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes etc.), network speeds are generally expressed as a number of bits per second (kilobits, megabits, gigabits etc.) The terms are very easy to confuse especially when they are abbreviated to just â€Å"meg†, â€Å"gig† etc. as both sets sometimes are. But, a broadband speed of â€Å"2 meg† would always mean â€Å"2 megabits per second† and never â€Å"2 megabytes per second†. Abbreviations are often used for these terms, and the same care needs to be taken. For example, the abbreviation for megabyte is MB whereas the abbreviation for megabit is Mb. The case of the â€Å"b† makes all the difference. The same is true for kilobytes/kilobits (KB/Kb), gigabytes/gigabits (GB/Gb) and so forth. Want to improve your English in five minutes a day? Get a subscription and start receiving our writing tips and exercises daily! Keep learning! Browse the Vocabulary category, check our popular posts, or choose a related post below:100 Words for Facial ExpressionsSelect vs. SelectedThe Difference Between "Shade" and "Shadow"

Friday, February 14, 2020

Global Operations managenment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words

Global Operations managenment - Essay Example In order to address this issue, PPQ Parts should uphold a decent relationship with every stakeholder of the country and do not engage into any activity which cause impairment to the reputation and goodwill of PPQ Parts. 1. The foremost economic issue for PPQ Parts would of exchange rate fluctuations. These adverse movements in foreign exchange rate can harm the company’s profits. So in order to mitigate this risk, PPQ Parts should implement a reasonable hedging strategy to combat this foreign exchange currency risk. 2. Another economic issue that the company might have to face is the level of inflation in the foreign country. Due to inflation, the cost of goods sold of PPQ Parts may increase resulting in lower profits. So in order to avoid this situation, PPQ Parts should estimate the reasonable demand of the PPQ Parts’ products and contract with the suppliers to fix the rates of materials for future